Two Weeks Later – High School Chemistry Comes In Handy

Sorry about taking a week off – it was a very humdrum week and I didn’t have anything inspiring me to write.  This week hasn’t been that exciting either.  I got some reloading done to go to a USPSA match here in town, but the weather was nasty and I didn’t go because there was another match down in Pueblo this weekend.  Again though, the weather was horrid and I stayed home.  I’ve got one more opportunity to meet my goal of shooting competitively each month, so I’m praying for good weather.

As I wrote in a previous post, I started some celery seeds last month.  I was starting to get worried as we were inside the 10-20 day germination period and nothing was happening.  Then, on Day 15, one seedling poked above the soil.

Celery Seedling

Celery Seedling

Hooray!  Today, as I post this there are now six celery seedlings coming up and according to my calendar it was time to start the onions.  I’ll give the celery a few more days to come up before I recycle the newspaper pots and soil into the raised bed, but I’ve got enough for my garden now.

The rest of my weekend was spent doing some basic maintenance on our vehicles, changing oil and checking fluids.  Stuff I’ve been doing since I was a teenager and isn’t in my 13 Skills challenge, but I noticed something that makes me think I’ll be replacing a car battery soon.

Battery Terminal Before

Battery Terminal Before

Pretty nasty looking isn’t it?  It’s caused by the sulfuric acid fumes coming from inside the battery.  I didn’t want this causing any more damage so I dug back into some high school chemistry to get rid of this mess.  The cup you see in the picture has some hot water, baking soda, and a wire brush in it.  The baking soda in the water creates a basic solution that neutralizes the acid and makes cleaning this up safe and easy.

Battery Terminal After

Battery Terminal After

Ta Da!  Shiny terminals again.  The copper sulfate turned my baking soda solution that green color.  I rinsed the top of the battery with purified water to clean things up.  This is a maintenance free battery and it’s three years old, so I’m taking this an indication it needs to be replaced soon.

I didn’t take any pictures, but I also repaired my chainsaw this weekend.  It’s an old Husqvarna model that I picked up at a pawn shop for relatively little cash.  Once I got it working last year by pulling the spark plug and replacing the old fuel, it sufficed to handle the minor cutting duties to allow us to use the fireplace a few times each year.  However, my wife had to brainstorm for me to use the chainsaw to level off the top of a large log in our backyard to use as a pedestal for a bird bath.  Shortly after that attempt at chainsaw carving (it’s alot harder than it looks!) the sprocket in the chain bar froze and the chainsaw was now kaput.  Again, the Internet came to the rescue!  After downloading the manual, I found I could replace the original 16 inch bar with a 20 inch bar and new chain.  Total cost was about $60 (over half what I paid for the saw), but it cuts like a dream now.  The extra bar length means I can cut through almost anything left from an old elm tree we had cut down three years ago.

I hope that was worth the wait.  Happiness is a sharp chainsaw!

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